With some time this weekend, I picked up a copy of Wolfenstein: The New Order (for my PS4 of course) and spent some time fragging Nazis.

Wolfenstein Gameplay Screenshot

Run and Gun, Baby! – courtesy of Bethesda Games

Built on the premise that the Nazis win the Second World War (by dropping an atomic bomb on Manhattan among other things), you start off as Wolfenstein stalwart B.J. Blazkowicz before this aforementioned turn of events on his way to bring hell to Hitler. Riding shotgun in a bomber during a massive air raid, I was blown away by the level of detail you’re treated to and found myself getting yelled at by my AI friend who really wanted me to get my act together as I took a gander or six at the surrounding environment.

Without spoiling too much, you start off with menial tasks around the plane to get you accustomed to the game controls and eventually find yourself on German soil growing used to gunfire, explosions and foul-mouthed soldiers (I’m assuming their cursing their virtual brains off). In fact, the first chapter or two is designed to rekindle your love of Nazi fragging and get you used to the gameplay before giving you our plot twist and getting you REALLY into the game.

We’re talking guns-blazing, free-flowing, hell-unleashed into the game.

Yet in a shift from previous titles, those of you who would prefer stealth and strategy as an option – essentially all of you smart and patient people – will appreciate the introduction of Commanders. Once they notice your presence, these pains-in-the-neck characters will continue to call-in reinforcements until such time as you dispatch them from the world. While I much prefer running into rooms guns blazing, I can attribute many of my deaths to these irritants and have found myself now taking my time and considering my approach.

It’s obvious from the get-go that the developers ensured enough time and detail was given to the storyline, and while I’ve only really scratched the surface of the entire game, find myself understanding each characters place in the game. Scenes before, throughout, and after each chapter provide a sufficient segue to the next task at hand and give the game a logical feel. If there were anything I could describe as a miss, it’s that some of the characters are given very little back story or definition, and while they do fit into the overall plot, have you wondering why they needed to be there in the first place.

I should probably admit this now, but I’m actually a fan of single-player story-lines. While I do enjoy the squad-play of multiplayer fraggers, I’ve grown ornery in my old age and have found myself trying to avoid hearing pre-pubescent teens and other such trash telling me what they are doing with my various family members.

Overall, I’m happy with my purchase (even if I missed out on the digital download discount) and would recommend Wolfenstein to anyone wanting to relive the simplicity we remember from id shoot-em-ups. Sure it’s single-player only (at least for now), but if you’re anything like me you won’t mind that fact – even more if you’re into achievements and secrets (there are plenty).

Or maybe you just want to experience the gem of an image below!

Wolfenstein Minigame

NIGHTMARE!